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10/20/2016

The next generation Airborne and Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-NG) is collecting data along the Gulf Coast. There have been several successful collections to date, imaging during both low and high tide events.

10/20/2016

For five weeks, clouds and high winds have prevented the CORAL project from venturing into the Torres Strait and northeast Great Barrier Reef (GBR) regions.  However, on Wednesday, October 12, the clouds cleared to a remarkable degree, allowing the CORAL flight team to image one of three regions in and around the Torres Strait.  The skies continued to be reasonably clear over the following days, allowing the flight team to image the remaining two northeast GBR regions.

10/20/2016

Airborne eXpendable Conductvity, Temperature and Depth (AXCTD) Science Element:  Last week, OMG’s AXCTD mission continued flight operations from Keflavík, Iceland.

10/07/2016

The ASO successfully completed the SnowEx baseline flights in Colorado. 

10/07/2016

The next generation Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS-Ng) deployed last week to KSC for flights over the Spacex Falcon 9 debris location.  Upon completion of the flights in Florida, the aircraft returned to Burbank to resume the California Methane Survey.  

10/07/2016

Airborne eXpendable Conductivity Temperature and Depth (AXCTD) Science Element: Last week, OMG’s AXCTD mission continued flight operations from Thule, Greenland.  OMG dropped over 40 AXCTDS south of Thule. On September 19, OMG departed Thule and flew to Keflavík, Iceland. On the way, OMG dropped 8 AXCTDs. 

Last week, OMG AXCTD flew 18 hours, and dropped over 50 AXCTD probes in OMG’s North West and South East Science areas.

Bathymetry element:  Terasond (OMG Bathymetry contractor) surveyed over 600 nautical miles of Greenland’s South Eastern science area last week.

10/07/2016

Since September 27, the P-3 returned to Wallops and the ER-2 flew from Namibia to Brazil on September 29 and from Brazil to Warner Robins (Georgia) on October 3. It will continue its transit back to Armstrong on October 7. The P-3 and the ER-2 were acquiring science data on the transit legs. AirMSPI acquired images across the entire Atlantic, including the overflight of two Aeronet stations on Ascension Island.

09/29/2016

Airborne eXpendable Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (AXCTD) Science Element:  Last week, OMG’s AXCTD mission arrived Svalbard, Norway. OMG few 4 flights, dropped over 30 AXCTDS and completed the North Eastern science area. On September 23, OMG departed Svalbard, in route to Thule, Greenland.  OMG dropped an additional 8 probes and landed in Thule, Greenland.  On September 24, OMG flew and dropped over 26 AXCTDS. Last week, OMG AXCTD flew 28 hours, and dropped over 60 AXCTD probes in OMG’s North East and North West Science areas.

Bathymetry element:  Terasond (OMG Bathymetry contractor) surveyed over 700 nautical miles of Greenland’s South Eastern science area last week.

09/29/2016

The L-band radar was directed to support a SpaceX request to locate Falcon 9 debris in Florida.  We surveyed the debris site near the launch pad in Cape Canaveral from 8 different look directions aboard the Armstrong G-III on September 22.

First step of our analysis is to look for test targets planted by the SpaceX team in the debris field consisting of mangrove and sandbar.  We just completed a preliminary assessment of the high resolution (1.5 m by 0.8 m) UAVSAR data of 4 of the 12 data takes acquired by visually inspecting the polarimetric signatures which are sensitive to flat metal plates.  The conclusion so far is that we can detect the test targets on the sandbar and under shorter trees, but that the test targets in the mangroves are not immediately detectable with visual inspection. 

09/29/2016

ER-2 and the P-3 performed their last science flights on September 22, 24, 25, and 27. Again, multiple transects under, within, and above the distinct layers of low clouds and elevated biomass burning aerosols (i.e. soot) above the Atlantic were observed with both aircrafts to study their properties along spatial gradients.

On September 27, the P-3 acquired science data on its way to the Ascension Island. It will continue on September 28 to Barbados before it returns to the US on September 29. 

Cloud droplet size retrieval using AirMSPI data acquired on Sunday, September 18. This example is unique with the two different cloud regimes. We performed retrievals for both parts of the image and found different cloud microphysical properties. Initial comparisons show agreement with colocated in-situ samples from the P-3.

Examples of APR-3 Observations in ORACLES:  September 20 contrast of drizzling (above) and non-precipitating (below) marine StratoCumulus in two different portions of the same deck.  Aerosol measurement instruments indicated significantly different aerosol conditions.

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